Monday, April 26, 2010

Pattern credit: a must!

I always swore I'd never make an entry about this because I hate when others do, yet here I am writing about it, so we can all take it for what it's worth :)

A new friend of mine on Ravelry recently brought to my attention that there are multiple people selling hats made from my Bella pattern in their Etsy shops.  I don't usually have a problem with this because it's a pretty basic hat and I've always been more than thrilled that people loved the pattern so much that they enjoyed making it so many times, haha.

However, in some of the links she sent me, the sellers were claiming that they had created the pattern themselves.  Now, because of the differences between my rendition and the actual hat featured in Twilight, I know this is not the case.  For example, I double-stranded my hat to make it thicker, and the ridges appear in different spots (mine only have four vertical ridges, whereas the original has eight, among other differences).  I don't think it's "right" to exactly copy an idea, and instead I like to put my own twist on them, using the original as inspiration (thought with everything that's out there, sometimes it's hard to be completely original, I'll admit).

I just want to put this out there: I DO NOT MIND if you want to sell things made from my patterns unless otherwise noted in the pattern itself (something which I've placed in my purchasable patterns on occasion).  That said, I DO MIND when the seller claims credit for the pattern.  I don't think I'm asking for much by saying a link to my blog would be nice :)  Or at the very least not having a statement explicitely claiming that all patterns in your shop are original.  I doubt people will think less of you if you admit someone else came up with the pattern.  Saying so wouldn't change your work's quality, and if they like that enough, they will still buy!

I'm not a huge Etsy seller, and I'm not a famous designer, so maybe this sound a little crazy coming from someone in my position.

The fiber industry is super friendly, and if your work is good enough, you will fall in with some great people.  I've met or spoken with some awesome crafters because of this blog and I'm always amazed at the talents and creativity I find here.  So please at least give credit to the people who take time to come up with the amazing patterns we're able to find thanks to innovative networks like Ravelry!

Thanks for listening to my ranting :P  I should have some projects to share soon, which I'm really excited about since a lot of my posts lately have nothing to do with what I've been making.  Additionally, I found a great tutorial on creating your own sock blocking devices out of plastic placemats, so as soon as I can take my $2 to Big Lots and purchase some, I'll be able to post my results, too!

2 comments:

cats-rockin-crochet said...

Here, here!!!!!
It hurts quite a bit when people do not give you just that little bit of credit! When they do not, you don't feel like posting your patterns for free! But because you are a genuine, kind and sharing person you and I, will still share our talent, as we know there are people out there who do appreciate it! Some times we just have to suck it up and come back bigger and better, you go girl!!!!

Kat said...

I think this is more than fair. I recently made your whitney headband and was asked whether I would be adding them to my etsy shop. I came here to see what your copyright policy is and I feel that you are well within your rights to say what you have. When I eventually get around to making some for my store I will most definately be placing a link to your blog and letting people know the pattern was yours. It is just common courtesy and I believe you deserve that.

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